BMW M6

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First generation[1][2]
1986 BMW M6
Production1983-1989
Automobile platformBMW E24
Internal combustion engine3.5 L I6 286 PS (282 hp/210 kW)
USA and catalyst version 256 hp (191 kW)
Transmission (mechanics)5-speed Manual transmission
Wheelbase2620 mm (103.1 in)
Length4755 mm (187.2 in)
USA 193.8 in (4923 mm)
Width1725 mm (67.9 in)
Height1354 mm (53.3 in)
Second generation
BMW M6 E64
Production2005-present
AssemblyDingolfing, Germany
Automobile platformBMW E64
Internal combustion engine5.0 L 507 bhp (378 kW; 514 PS) V10 engine
Transmission (mechanics)7-speed (Electrohydraulic manual transmission)
6-speed Manual transmission
Wheelbase109.5 in (2781 mm)
Length191.8 in (4872 mm)
Width73 in (1854 mm)
Height54 in (1372 mm)

The BMW M6 is a high-performance version of the 6-Series automobile, designed by the motorsport division of the Germany manufacturer.

Contents

E24 M635CSi/"M6"


In 1983 BMW took the M88/3 engine, a modified version of the M88/1 from the BMW M1 and put it in the E24 chassis of the BMW 6-Series, creating the M635CSi (called "M6" in North America). The "M6" was critically acclaimed throughout its lifespan for its elegant, aggressive "shark-nose" styling, its well-appointed luxury features, and its quick performance. An M6 can be distinguished from other E24 models by a larger air dam, M badges on the grille and back, and a subtle brakes

In the U.S, the E24 "M6" was fitted with the Catalytic converter S38 motor, producing 256 hp (191 kW) and 243 ft·lbf (329 N·m) of torque. The European version did not need catalysts, and produced 286 hp (213 kW) and 251 ft·lbf (340 N·m) of torque. The "M6" was good for a 0-60 mph (97 km/h) time of 6.4 and 6.8 seconds for the European and American versions, respectively. However, Car and Driver Magazine tested the U.S. "M6" in July of 1987 and achieved a 0-60 mph (97 km/h) time of 6.1 seconds. Also in 1987 Road and Track featured the U.S. "M6" as one of the 10 fastest cars in America.

Production of the "M6" ended in 1989, with 5,855 cars sold, 1,767 of which were North American (U.S. & Canada) models.

E63/64 M6


The new BMW M6 concept made its debut at the 2005 Geneva Motor Show. It is based on the BMW E63/E64 6-Series, introduced in 2004. It shares the same 5.0 L V10 engine S85 engine and SMG III gearbox with the E60 M5, and produces 507 hp (373 kW) / 384 ft·lbf (521 Nm).

BMW claims it accelerates from 0 to 100 km/h (62 Miles per hour) in 4.6 seconds (0-60 mph: 4.1 s [Road & Track [2/06]) and has an electronically limited top speed of 250 km/h (155 mph). With the limiter removed, the top speed can reach 330 km/h (205 mph). [3]

The M6 has the same 'power button' as the M5 which modifies the throttle response. From ignition, the car delivers 399 hp (298 kW), but engaging the button allows the full 500 hp (370 kW) in the US (507 PS in Europe). It weighs 3,770 lb (1,710 kg) thanks to a Carbon fibre reinforced plastic roof panel as well as Thermoplastic front wings, aluminum doors and bonnet and compound boot lid.

The carbon fiber and other light materials are used in places like the bumpers and roof that are far from the center of gravity and/or high up, so that they not only reduce the overall weight but improve the Car handling by reducing, respectively, the Moment of inertia and the Center of mass height.

It is currently available as a Coupe and a Convertible. A lightweight CSL version of the M6 was expected to be released in the near future, however, BMW has since officially stated that no such version of the M6 will be built, as there is currently no market for such a model. The 2007 Cabriolet is expected to have a 0-60 mph time in about 4.6 seconds(4.8 convertible)(Road and Track, September 2006). Both the M6 coupe and convertible can be visually distinguished from the 630i, 645Ci and 650i by their deeper front valance with air intakes, more contoured side sills, aerodynamic side view mirrors, an additional rear valance with diffuser and the absence of front fog lights.

References


  1. Oswald, Werner (2001). Deutsche Autos 1945-1990. Stuttgart: Motorbuch Verlag. p. 241. ISBN 3-613-02131-5. 
  2. Covello, Mike (2002). Standard Catalog of Imported Cars 1946-2002. Iola: Krause Publications. pp. 155–157. ISBN 0-87341-205-8. 
  3. "BMW's New M6 Is All You Need, and Then Some...". Edmunds.com. http://www.edmunds.com/insideline/do/Drives/FirstDrives/articleId=106100. 
  • Kable, G (December 14, 2004). BMW unleashes M6 supercoupe. Autocar pp. 8-11.

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